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Featured Articles: Vol. 2, Issue 2
Vol. 2, Issue 2

The new issue of In Training is now available. In this edition, we discuss the new ICD-10 classification system, becoming proficient in the Whipple procedure, and the importance of bedside manner for surgeons.
 
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Vol. 2, Issue 2

Beginning January 2012, surgical practices around the country will begin using a new classification system—the ICD-10—to characterize their patients’ medical conditions. The transition from the ICD-9 to version 10 represents a transformation in documentation that will affect medicine in profound ways, from research to reporting performance measures and reimbursement.

Vol. 2, Issue 2

The Whipple procedure, or pancreaticoduodenectomy, is the most commonly performed surgery for pancreatic cancer, a disease with a notoriously poor prognosis. It also is one of the most complex and demanding operations in surgery. For surgeons-in-training, mastering the technique may require making the most of every learning opportunity, since cases may be limited.

Vol. 2, Issue 2

One of the roles physicians play is that of teacher. Teaching happens at every level—interns educate students, residents teach interns, fellows teach residents, and attending physicians teach them all. 

Vol. 2, Issue 2

Despite the increasing pressure on surgeons to treat higher volumes of patients, the few studies examining surgeon–patient interactions indicate that surgeons are doing a good job when it comes to bedside manner.

Vol. 2, Issue 2

Kyla Terhune, MD, believes in the benefits of society membership for surgical residents, even though she admits the process is overwhelming. How does a resident or fellow decide which society to join, if any?